Allegra  Rose

Interview

First, talk to us about your evolution of fashion. When did you start to document your style and what were your original goals? I have always been more drawn to creating my own aesthetic of fashion, than following trends. Growing up in Minnesota and Colorado, I was always drawn to pieces reminiscent of "70's summer camp:" vintage crewneck sweatshirts, corduroy overalls, flowery sundresses, washed denim, wool sweaters. When I moved to California a few years ago, I definitely started noticing my style shift to be more influenced by sustainable designers on the West Coast, Christy Dawn, Whimsy + Row, Boyish Jeans.

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It was so fun to see your evolution from more traditional mainstream brands to more sustainable fashion. What made you make the switch? It's definitely still a process, but I enjoy the journey of discovering small businesses with well-made pieces. You can just tell by the quality of the fabrics and the attention to detail that more love went into these garments! To me, it feels much better investing in a sustainable piece I really love, rather than rushing to fast fashion sites - to buy something that thousands of other people have, and isn't as well made.

Share with us what you are looking for when shopping for a new piece of clothing. A really beautifully made basic piece always gets me. My weakness is overalls.

First, talk to us about your evolution of fashion. When did you start to document your style and what were your original goals? I have always been more drawn to creating my own aesthetic of fashion, than following trends. Growing up in Minnesota and Colorado, I was always drawn to pieces reminiscent of "70's summer camp:" vintage crewneck sweatshirts, corduroy overalls, flowery sundresses, washed denim, wool sweaters. When I moved to California a few years ago, I definitely started noticing my style shift to be more influenced by sustainable designers on the West Coast, Christy Dawn, Whimsy + Row, Boyish Jeans.

It was so fun to see your evolution from more traditional mainstream brands to more sustainable fashion. What made you make the switch? It's definitely still a process, but I enjoy the journey of discovering small businesses with well-made pieces. You can just tell by the quality of the fabrics and the attention to detail that more love went into these garments! To me, it feels much better investing in a sustainable piece I really love, rather than rushing to fast fashion sites - to buy something that thousands of other people have, and isn't as well made.

Share with us what you are looking for when shopping for a new piece of clothing. A really beautifully made basic piece always gets me. My weakness is overalls.

Talk to us about your journey to sustainable fashion. So many people are trying to make that switch to a more sustainable closest right now - we would love to hear your ups and downs. Little by little, I like investing in sustainable pieces to build my "forever" wardrobe. These are pieces that I have bought from sustainable designers, that I think are staple pieces I'll always have. I think the biggest thing for me was realizing that it's okay that I still own pieces from Urban Outfitters, Free People and so on. The most sustainable thing you can do is to wear what you have. Something that has also helped me so much in pairing down my wardrobe is finding new homes for my pieces I don't wear anymore through closet sales, and sending in the pieces that don't sell to ThredUp. ThredUp is amazing because they send you a "clean out" bag, and you just fill it with all the clothes you want to sell through their site. The best thing about it is that if the clothes don't sell on their site, they make sure that the clothes are responsibly recycled, so they don't end up in landfills.

Last question, who inspires you? People who are advocates for our planet! Right now, I'd definitely say that Leah Thomas of Intersectional Environmentalist is my biggest inspiration. She is so intelligent and creative in her activism.

Follow Allegra at @allegraroseb

Allegra Rose

Interview

Talk to us about your journey to sustainable fashion. So many people are trying to make that switch to a more sustainable closest right now - we would love to hear your ups and downs. Little by little, I like investing in sustainable pieces to build my "forever" wardrobe. These are pieces that I have bought from sustainable designers, that I think are staple pieces I'll always have. I think the biggest thing for me was realizing that it's okay that I still own pieces from Urban Outfitters, Free People and so on. The most sustainable thing you can do is to wear what you have. Something that has also helped me so much in pairing down my wardrobe is finding new homes for my pieces I don't wear anymore through closet sales, and sending in the pieces that don't sell to ThredUp. ThredUp is amazing because they send you a "clean out" bag, and you just fill it with all the clothes you want to sell through their site. The best thing about it is that if the clothes don't sell on their site, they make sure that the clothes are responsibly recycled, so they don't end up in landfills.

Last question, who inspires you? People who are advocates for our planet! Right now, I'd definitely say that Leah Thomas of Intersectional Environmentalist is my biggest inspiration. She is so intelligent and creative in her activism.

Follow Allegra at @allegraroseb